Crisped Flatbread AIP
AIP,  Breads,  Recipes,  Sides

Crisped Flatbread

A dipper. A dunker. A cracker. A sopper.  This Crisped Flatbread recipe is all the things.  Crispy on the outside, a little bit tender and a little bit chewy on the inside.  Nut-free, egg-free fun little flat breads are handy helpers for guac (or this O.M.Green Goodness Dip), soup, tostadas and sauce-soaking.

Crisped Flatbread AIP

These cook up flat and crispy.  There’s a lovely delicate crunch to the outside and just a tad bit of chewiness and tenderness in the thin center.  A divine combo for when you kinda want a cracker but you kinda want bread at the same time. (These are not quite foldable and resilient like my Cassava Flour Tortillas.  If you want tender, pliable bread…check ’em out. They’re a bit of extra work but totally worth it.)

Crisped Flatbread AIP

Crisped Flatbread AIP

Tigernut flour gives these bread babies a mild sweetness and a lovely “nutty” texture, minus the nuts.  Tigernuts are actually starchy tubers with no tree nuts in sight!  Anthony’s Tigernut Flour quickly became one of ab-fav pantry staples.  It’s moister, softer, and finer ground than others I’ve tried.

The tapioca starch acts as a binder, and helps to keep the breads a little pliable.  I have noticed that after these are chilled then reheated briefly in the microwave they do soften a bit and the crunch factor has almost disappeared.  Straight out of the fridge they are firmer yet still softer.  They may crisp up again in a pan, but I haven’t tried that yet as I was happy to have a softer version for an open-faced sandwich after the chill/reheat factor.  Need compliant deli meat for that sammie?  My Homemade Deli Chicken recipe is easy and super clean.

Crisped Flatbread AIP

Crisped Flatbread AIP

These would serve better for crispy tostadas on your Tostada Tuesday night.  They do not bend and fold like tortillas.  They will crack in the center if you try to fold and eat them that way, and you will have a pile of taco-fillin’s in your lap before you know it.  Just a heads up.  Because true story that happened to Yours Truely.

If you are craving crackers or a bread that you can tear little pieces off at a time and nom away on, these will not disappoint!  I’ve even used these for little pizzettes in a pinch.  I just go easy on the sauce as too much softens the thin bread quite a bit as it bakes…but when I’m craving a quick pizza and I have one of these leftover in the fridge I GIVE ZERO you-know-whats if it’s a little too soft. If you get the hangries, you know what I mean!

Crisped Flatbread AIP

I attempted to avoid adding coconut fiber to these so that they could be a choice for those that are intolerant of coconut flour, but they were way too sticky and were almost impossible to get unstuck from the pan.  So in the coconut flour went to help dry up the mixture a bit and balance out the starches from the tapioca and tigernut, and it worked beautifully.

For versatility sake, I even tried making this with coconut MILK versus well-mixed coconut CREAM and the result was sadly another sticky mess.  There needs to be a good amount of fat in the batter for these to work, and the coconut cream wins the gold medal for this fatty task.  I also tried it with just plain ol’ water to see if we could avoid coconut altogether and…FAIL.  As far as other substitutions go, I really am unsure because once I got this perfect after so many tries I was like, “HALLELUJAH, THIS FLATBREAD IS FINALLY PERFECT AFTER THE UPTEENTH TRY! NO MORE TWEAKING!”

So enjoy, my friends. It’s a crispy goodun’.

Check out this recipe, and other delicious AIP recipes at Phoenix Helix’s Recipe Roundtable!
Crisped Flatbread
Yields 5
Nut-free, egg-free and crispy-chewy. Tigernut flatbread that's perfect for sopping up sauce or making open-faced sandwiches. AIP compliant!
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup coconut cream, shaken well before opening and measuring to distribute evenly (if the fatty cream has solidified due to cold storage, you can whiz the watery liquid with the solid cream in your blender, then measure)
  2. 1/2 cup tigernut flour
  3. 1/2 cup tapioca starch
  4. 2 tsp coconut flour
  5. 1/8 tsp Himalayan salt
  6. refined avocado oil or other compliant high-heat cooking fat
Instructions
  1. Heat 6" cast iron skillet over medium heat for at least 7 to 10 minutes. (The batter will stick too much if the heat is too low.)
  2. Meanwhile, in a medium mixing bowl, mix together the flours and salt.
  3. Heat the coconut cream until warm (I use my microwave for 30 to 60 seconds), then pour it over the flour mixture.
  4. Whisk well until smooth and combined.
  5. Drizzle the hot pan with about 1 tsp of oil…just enough to fully coat the bottom of the pan.
  6. Pour 1/4 cup of the batter into the pan, and spread it out a bit so that the bread is not too thick, not too thin. It doesn’t have to be a perfect shape. 🙂
  7. Cook for 3 minutes, then use a spatula to flip it over. It will look a little gummy and browned in spots, but that's ok for now. We are going to cook that side again shortly.
  8. Cook the second side for 3 minutes until the second side is dried and nicely browned.
  9. Flip the bread over again and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes or until the first side is cooked through and golden brown.
  10. NOTE: I have had success cooking this on a very even, very flat induction burner for 4.5 minutes per side, only flipping once. This may be an option for you if you have a similar cooking surface, though I recommend rotating your pan 90 degrees halfway through each side to help distribute the heat and avoid burnt/undercooked spots.
Notes
  1. Serve slathered with ghee (AIP reintroduction) or dipped in herbed & salted olive oil. Or try it torn into pieces and dipped into my O.M.Green Goodness Dip for a veggie boost!
  2. Also delicious with curries to sop up that extra sauce, or as a sandwich bread with this easy Homemade Deli Chicken.
The Unskilled Cavewoman https://www.theunskilledcavewoman.com/

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29 Comments

    • Samantha Jo Teague

      Hi Sarah,
      I did try it with arrowroot once, and it stuck to the pan a bit more than tapioca. This experiment was before I added the coconut flour to the tapioca recipe…making it successful. I didn’t try again with coconut flour and arrowroot, so there mayyyy be a chance that it will work. I hope that helps! ?

        • Samantha Jo Teague

          You’re welcome! We made these again tonight on my stove (which is notorious for uneven heating) and I accidentally let the first side cook too long and it stuck to the pan. Ugh! I didn’t have that issue with my induction burner, that thing is awesome. I’m going back in and adding some more coconut flour tomorrow to test it out in hopes of creating more room for error with the recipe! Stay tuned ?

          2/11 UPDATE: Well the extra coconut flour didn’t improve it, lol. I am going to adjust the recipe to preheat the cast iron pan for at least 10 minutes vs 5, as that helped. Hot pan = less stick!

    • Samantha Jo Teague

      Hi there Valerie,
      Sadly, no. This is one sub I tried and the batter turned into a molten glue in the pan. That was fun to clean, whew! 🙁 The coconut flour needs to be in there as a drying agent to balance the starchiness of the tigernut flour.

    • Samantha Jo Teague

      Hi Bruce, Yep..coconut cream! Just make sure that the liquids and solids in the container of cream are completely shaken / blended together before measuring. (Not just the solid, fatty cream part that is famous for hardening when chilled.)

      • Bruce W Krafft

        Okely-Dokely! And thank-you for your hard work on all these recipes. My wife and I have been doing Keto and AIP for several months now; I’ve lost 40 pounds and my IBS is almost completely cleared up, and she’s lost 45 pounds, sleeps better, has more energy and just plain feels better overall, but it can be hard to find good recipes.

    • Samantha Jo Teague

      Hi Tess,
      It *may work, though I haven’t tried cassava in this recipe. I created it with tigernut because I started developing gut pain when I over-did cassava (sadly…I LOVE cassava!). Cassava flour does absorb a lot more liquid than starchy tigernut, so you would probably need to increase the liquid a bit, or add water. Maybe try 1/4 of a batch with a tad more liquid and see how it comes out? Let me know if you give it a shot! 🙂

  • Susan Pargman

    I made this recipe and it tasted good, but it was not at all crispy. Side one blackened in less than a minute. I thought maybe the pan was too hot, so I turned it down. Still, each “pancake” (that’s how they all turned out) was soft and blackened very fast. I used coconut oil to oil the pan. Any hints on how to get the crispiness you talked about? Thanks!

    • Samantha Jo Teague

      Hi Susan,
      Oh no, I’m sorry to hear that they didn’t crisp up for you! I’m just going to ask a couple troubleshooting questions to see if I can help you get those crispy breads… Was your coconut oil refined or virgin? Was your coconut cream evenly mixed before measuring? What type of pan did you use? 🙂

      • Susan Pargman

        Coconut cream was fully warmed and stirred. Coconut oil was the liquid type. Pan was cast iron.

        • Samantha Jo Teague

          Thanks for the info Susan! My guess is it’s possibly the liquid (MCT?) coconut oil causing the blackening before the breads can crisp up. I use liquid cococnut oil in smoothies and dressing myself, but haven’t tried cooking with it before. Do you have refined avocado or refined olive oils to try instead? Or lard possibly? Sorry the recipe isn’t coming out right for you. 🙁

          I also have a video of the flat breads being made that I have been meaning to add to the post for a while now, so I will get that up today in hopes it will help with troubleshooting. 🙂

  • Susan Pargman

    Update! I’m going to have to admit that I was using an unmarked jar of what I *thought* was coconut flour in the crisp bread recipe. It was not. Best guess was that it was an old jar of almond flour. Who confuses almond flour with coconut flour? Apparently I do… Duh!

    • Samantha Jo Teague

      Oh my! Hehehe…thanks for the giggle Susan…but don’t feel bad! I still have an old jar of water chestnut flour on my baker’s rack that I am too “frugal” to throw away, but have been too scared to try because I am worried about how my gut will react. LOL!

    • Samantha Jo Teague

      Hi Robyn,
      I store these in the fridge in an airtight container. I haven’t tried freezing them yet, as we gobble them fairly quickly! But I would bet that they would freeze well also. 🙂

      • Robyn

        Thanks making them tonight. I’m nervous about the coconut flour, was gonna try with just one tablespoon as it is like a gut bomb for me. Was wondering if I used 1 T Coconut and 1 Almond that might be ok? I’ll let you know

        • Samantha Jo Teague

          I’m sorry Robyn! I just now saw your comment. We are out of town right now and I missed it.
          If you tolerate almond flour better than coconut flour, 1/2 cup almond flour + 1/2 cup tapioca starch + 1 cup coconut milk makes great flatbreads too! They soften quickly but make yummy dipping breads. I also make soft tacos for my clients with that recipe.

  • Rachael M.

    So… I do not own a cast iron pan (in fact, they’ve always intimidated me because I’m worried I won’t clean/care for it properly and/or too much effort). Is there any way this would work with a stainless steel pan?

    • Samantha Jo Teague

      Hi Rachael,
      I too was intimidated for a long time about cast iron and avoided it like the plague! Hehe. But now I use mine often (I have a set of 4 sizes)…and clean it once it cools with hot, non-toxic-soapy water and a good scrub pad; then immediately dry it out with a kitchen towel; drizzle a little avocado or refined coconut oil in the pan and use a paper towel to rub the inside well. Voila!

      For non-stick skillets, though…I have made an almond flour version of this for my clients in their non-stick frying pan and it worked out well. I have never made this tigernut recipe in one, though, so I am unsure if it may stick more than usual since tigernuts are more starchy than almonds. Maybe make 1/4 batch and see how it comes out? If it doesn’t crisp then you should still have a lovely little bread to tear apart and snack on. 🙂